• Prepare to Survive Shows

  • 1
  • 1 How to Survive a Lightning Strike.
  • 2 How to Survive a Volcano.
  • 3 How to Survive a Forest Fire.
  • 4 How to Survive a Blizzard.
  • 5 How to Survive a House Fire. class
  • 6 How to Survive a Drought.
  • 7 How to Survive a Tsunami.
  • 8 How to Survive a Hurricane.
  • 9 How to Survive an Earthquake.
  • 10 How to Survive a Tornado.
  • 11 How to Survive a Flash Flood.
  • How to Survive a Lightning Strike.

    Use the 30/30 Rule

    If, after seeing lightning, you can't count to 30 before hearing thunder, get inside a building or car. Don't go outside until 30 minutes after the last clap of thunder.

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  • How to Survive a Volcano.

    Evacuation Procedures

    Obtain a hazard-zone map from your local emergency management agency. These maps show the probable paths of lava and mud and give estimates for the time it would take a flow to reach a given location.

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  • How to Survive a Forest Fire.

    Situational Awareness

    Safe zones include rivers, lakes (get in the water), or large level spots out in the open away from combustible material. Heat rises, so the safest zones are those that are downhill of the fire.

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  • How to Survive a Blizzard.

    Dress properly for cold weather

    During snowstorm or blizzard, it is imperative to know the differences between watches and warnings in order to properly prepare or take the appropriate actions and stay safe.

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  • How to Survive a House Fire. class

    Plan your escape route

    Escaping from a fire will be easier if you have already planned your escape route and know where to go. Make sure that your route remains free of any obstructions and that there are no loose floor coverings that could trip you.

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  • How to Survive a Drought.

    Water Rationing Plan

    Humans require about 3/4 gallon of water daily just to live. Including water usage for sanitation, you should plan on each person in your household using a gallon of water per day.

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  • How to Survive a Tsunami.

    Prepared, vigilant, and calm.

    People on the beach or in low coastal areas need to be aware that a tsunami could arrive within minutes after a severe earthquake. The tsunami danger period can continue for many hours after a major earthquake.

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  • How to Survive a Hurricane.

    Family Disaster Plan

    Surviving a hurricane is about preparation, knowing what to do during the hurricane and taking appropriate precautions after it has passed through. Do drills demonstrating that they know how to turn off water, gas and electricity.

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  • How to Survive an Earthquake.

    Drop, cover, and hold.

    Earthquakes are among the most destructive natural disasters. They occur mainly near the edges of tectonic plates, but they can happen just about anywhere. Earthquakes cannot be predicted.

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  • How to Survive a Tornado.

    Nature's most violent storms

    Tornadoes carry winds up to 300 mph (480 km/h)--winds that can level buildings and carry cars through the air 80 feet (25 m) or more--they are also often accompanied by lightning, heavy rains (and flash floods), and hail.

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  • How to Survive a Flash Flood.

    Don’t try to cross floodwaters.

    The majority of flash flood deaths are vehicle related. Because flash floods usually take people by surprise, they appear harmless at first. The problem is that it only takes 1 to 2 feet of flood water to sweep a vehicle away.

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